Advanced graphics for Inform 7

Posts tagged ‘grim reaper’

Project: Kerkerkruip Title Sequence

I have begun my first Glimmr project (aside from the extensions themselves, of course): I am working on an animated title sequence for Kerkerkruip, Victor Gijsbers’s excellent interactive fiction roguelike. Kerkerkruip has recently moved into a new, open phase of development, with the source code on github and design input being actively solicited, so this is a good time for other folks to get involved as well!

Since this blog has been silent for a time’s-stitch of months, it is probably worth contextualizing a bit. Kerkerkruip is written in Inform 7, a system for writing text adventures. I have written a suite of extensions for the system that allows users to realize something close to the full potential of Inform 7′s otherwise barely-there support for graphics. Those extensions are collectively known as Glimmr. You can explore Glimmr in more detail through other posts on this blog; in particular, there are a number of posts on its animation capabilities.

So, the plan for the title sequence is pretty simple: First, we show the Kerkerkruip cover art. Then, because Kerkerkruip is primarily a game of tactical combat vs. interesting enemies–including a golem made of chains, a bouncing exploding ball of flesh, and a telepathic slug–we present a rogue’s gallery of the characters that the player has engaged with.

I have chosen to “draw” these character portraits using a kind of typographic collage, using only letterforms to render lines, volumes, patterns, etc. I’m posting drafts of them to Pinterest as they’re completed. There are a couple of more finished examples later in the post; I am also linking to a few of my touchstones for the style used. (You might think of the form as a lower-resolution version of the examples of “typewriter art” that have hit the web lately.) This approach seems an appropriate nod to both interactive fiction and to roguelikes, the former because of its emphasis on text–of course–and the latter for their association with individual ASCII symbols to represent game entities. At the same time, this sort of typographic collage doesn’t fall afoul of the “retro” sandtrap (as straight-up ASCII art likely would). Finally–and critically!–the technique shifts the execution from a problem of draftsmanship to one of design. That’s a place I feel a lot more comfortable.

The sequence is still in the planning stage. Here is the current breakdown:

  1. Fade in on the Kerkerkruip cover art and let it hover a moment.
  2. Cross-fade to a typographically collaged version of the cover art’s cell bars, then zoom forward, through the bars, to show the game’s main menu options.
  3. At any time after we arrive at the main menu, the player may make a selection from the menu to continue. The main menu itself may have some very minor (read: eye candy) movement.
  4. Once the main menu is in view, the rogue’s gallery will begin animating alongside, flipping at a leisurely pace through the enemies that the player has faced one by one. A few statistics summarizing the player’s encounters with each enemy will be displayed next to it.
  5. The gallery loops until the player makes a menu selection, at which point the menu fades out and the screen selected appears.

Here are a couple of mockups of entries from the rogue’s gallery, featuring the giant tentacle and the reaper, a serial killer who dresses up like Death:

 

 

 

The visual metaphor is of a stack of placards, which we’re shown one at a time; they are intended to vaguely resemble character cards in a game like Yomi or Magic: The Gathering. The statistics to be shown are not final; we’ll need to see what’s feasible/desirable to keep track of. If there aren’t enough different statistics, information about the character itself could be used.

Thoughts/comments on the plan or the mockups are welcome!

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